Amazon Flex: Cutting Prime Delivery Time in Half

Ally Feiam By Ally Feiam | 07 May 2019

In an effort to cut the Prime delivery window in half, Amazon is hiring hundreds of new DSP drivers for a new program, Amazon Flex.

Amazon has a new plan to cut its Prime delivery period in half, thanks to their upcoming hiring spree for delivery drivers with Amazon Flex. The retail giant is currently hiring hundreds of drivers throughout the U.S, with hopes to increase the number of Prime deliveries and lower delivery time.

They are currently looking for new drivers across 50 U.S cities, according to their job listings. The tech company made the effort to expand its delivery network in 2018 with DSP. Amazon’s delivery drivers are owned and operated by DSP.

Amazon is also planning to hire more people into its network in the coming months in a new program. As motivation to join the program, Amazon showcased the incentives and potential yearly profit of up to USD$300,000.

DSP drivers don’t need any prior experience to be accepted. They must be over the age of 21, with a driver’s license, newer smartphone, car insurance and a minimum investment of USD$10,000. Along with the program, drivers receive discounts on Amazon-branded Mercedes-Benz Sprint vans, uniforms, petrol programs and comprehensive insurance coverage.

With a fleet of up to 40 vans, the job also involves managing a team of 40 to 100 employees. “We are excited to add hundreds more new small businesses at both existing stations as well as dozens of new delivery stations in the coming months, and we’ll add more opportunities for independent contractors to be their own boss and create their own schedules delivering with Amazon Flex.” says an Amazon spokesperson.

Amazon Flex has launched in Kansas City, with an influx of drivers taking part in the role. “Amazon is trying to break the stranglehold that UPS and Federal Express have had on them from the start,” says Chris Kuehl, Co-Founder of Armada Corporate Intelligence, “It’s Amazon saying, ‘Hey, we can do this [home delivery] ourselves.”

Drivers can make anywhere from USD$18 to USD$25 an hour, and have the option to be flexible in their working hours, hence the name. Flex workers must also have access to a recent smartphone, as the app issued by Amazon tells them where to go, and requests photos taken of delivered items at the consumer’s doorstep. Despite the minimum requirements needed for the role, there is very little training to be a part of Amazon Flex.

As the program becomes exceedingly popular, opportunities to join it in certain cities have been rejected. In Kansas City, there are so many who wish to join that the job listings are no longer available. Amazon Flex driver, Eric Deiter says “Because so many drivers are interested right now, it’s very difficult to get the work.”

With the promise of “Great money,” and “Great flexibility”, Amazon Flex continues to hire more workers for this initiative, with plans to expand the program even further.

Like this story? Sign-up for the free Pulse Weekly Newsletter for more essential online retail content.